Monthly Archives: November 2014

WTIC-1080AM Community Connections Radio

11/29/2014
The Connecticut ALICE Report. Tune in to 1080AM for a discussion of ALICE in our communities.

Listen/Download | Stream Online


RNNTV Richard French Live

11/28/2014
Kim Morgan (CEO, United Way of Western Connecticut) speaks with Richard French about the ALICE Report.


News12 Focus on Connecticut

11/27/2014
Donna Pfrommer (United Way of Coastal Fairfield County) and Trish Kallman speak with Tom Appleby of News12 about the Connecticut ALICE Report.


Hartford Courant Working Poor Need A Boost More Than Ever

by Toni Dolan 11/26/2014 

The recent release of the United Way’s ALICE report on the plight of the working, low-income population in Connecticut has brought much needed attention to needs of this struggling group. The hardships of the working poor have grown exponentially in the recent economic downturn. Yet the resources available to this population have only diminished.

At the Beth-El Center, we serve families and individuals in the Milford/New Haven area who are struggling to make ends meet. Although they have jobs, they are dangerously close to a life of poverty. With 22% of Milford’s population falling into the ALICE category and another 5% living in poverty, many of our friends and neighbors are facing hardship.

Continue reading: Courant.com


WATR-1320AM Radio Interview with Tom Chute

11/25/2014
Tom Chute (WATR 1320-AM)discusses the United Way ALICE report with Don Mroz, Ph.D.
(President, Post University), Kristen Jacoby (President/CPO, United Way of Greater Waterbury), and Joann Reynolds-Balanda (VP of Community Impact, United Way of Greater Waterbury).


The Day Problems known, solutions more elusive

11/25/2014 

On the campaign trail in September, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced a series of initiatives aimed at encouraging job creation and business growth, along with more state investment in affordable housing.

We agreed with those proposals then. Now, in the wake of a detailed United Way report showing that financial struggles are startlingly and stubbornly pervasive throughout the state, the need for those initiatives has taken on a sense of absolute urgency.

The United Way’s study of financial hardship in the state focused specifically on a segment of the population labeled as ALICE – Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. While 10 percent of the state’s population is officially designated as living in poverty, more than a third of Connecticut’s families struggle to afford the basic necessities of food, housing, child care, health care and transportation.

They live below the ALICE line, not making enough to live with any sense of economic security.

Continue reading: TheDay.com


Hartford Courant State’s Cost of Living Leaves Many Short

by Susan Dunn 11/23/2014 

The American dream is that if you work hard, you can expect to get ahead financially. For most of us, that means you can save money, buy a reliable car, purchase a home if you want, afford quality child care, send your children to college, handle unexpected expenses, pay for your family’s health care and take family vacations.

But as John Lennon reportedly said, “Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.” That is exactly what happened to my family more than two decades ago. My husband’s business closed, he wanted to go back to school to prepare for a new career, we had three school-age children and a mortgage. I suddenly found that my full-time income qualified my children for free or reduced lunch at the public school they attended. By any measurement, we were clearly struggling to make ends meet.

Although this was more than 20 years ago and we are now better off financially, the same is not true for many families in Connecticut, as documented in Connecticut United Ways’ recently released in-depth study of the financial hardship faced by many working families throughout our state. The study reports that 35 percent of Connecticut households can barely afford life’s necessities. We have known that about 10 percent of Connecticut households live in poverty, but we have overlooked the 25 percent of households with income above the federal poverty level but below the state’s basic cost-of-living threshold defined in the United Way report.

Continue reading: Courant.com


Greenwich Time Rutgers: A paycheck away from homelessness

by Alma Rutgers 11/21/2014 

Who is ALICE?

We all know and encounter ALICE everyday. ALICE provides services we depend upon. ALICE could be a secretary, salesperson, food service worker, nursing assistant, landscaper, cleaning person, or personal care aide.

ALICE is an acronym for “Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed.” ALICE households are working households whose members hold jobs that do not pay enough to afford basic necessities: housing, childcare, food, health care, and transportation. ALICE households have incomes above the U.S. poverty level but below the bare minimum for economic survival in a given area. ALICE households, together with poverty households, constitute a population that’s in a constant struggle to make ends meet.

“They are in perpetual danger of falling into homelessness,” said Jason Shaplen, CEO of Stamford-based Inspirica, the largest provider of services to the homeless in Fairfield County.

Continue reading: GreenwichTime.com


Middletown Press Middlesex United Way: 25 percent of families struggling financially

by Kevin Wilhelm 11/21/2014 

Has there been a time in your life when you struggled to make ends meet? When you avoided your landlord or carefully planned when to pay a credit card bill and when to pay your electric bill?

For some of us, this may have been our life after we got our first job or had our first child. But for many Connecticut families, the stress of living paycheck to paycheck is their life day after day, month after month and year after year.

In a report published last week, Connecticut United Ways and Rutgers University found that despite working hard, 25 percent of Connecticut households earn above the federal poverty line but under a basic cost-of-living threshold defined in the report.

Continue reading: MiddletownPress.com


Trumbull Times Who is ALICE? Report looks at struggling families in state, Fairfield County

by Kate Czaplinski 11/21/2014 

A report released this week by the United Way of Connecticut is shedding light on the large number of hard-working families in the state that are still struggling to make ends meet.

United Way released the Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed (ALICE) Study of Financial Hardship, showing that 474,445 households in the state are unable to pay for the costs of basic household needs in Connecticut. The report was done by United Way’s research partner, Rutgers University.
ALICE is the most comprehensive depiction of financial need in the state to date, according to Richard Porth, president and CEO of the United Way of Connecticut, using data from a variety of sources, including the U.S. census and the American Community Survey.

The report shows that while 10% of the state population is living under the federal poverty line, another 25% struggle to pay basic household needs, are unable to save for the future and would be unable to weather an emergency without falling into poverty.

Continue reading: TrumbullTimes.com